I’m baaaaaack…..?

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Happy New Year!  Nothing says a fresh start to 2013 like a closeup photo from The Shining.  🙂

But I am back.  Part of me wants to hedge and say “well, I am back….but sort of”, or “well I’m just part-time.”  Until I quickly realize that those are old, familiar, ridiculous cultural scripts that I have been purging from my life for the past three years.  That crappy mantra that you spend a good chunk of your life training for a profession that you truly have no idea what will look like over the course of your life, and then you get a job and stay in it for the remainder of your career come hell or high water.

What a crock.

For those of you who regularly read my blog (and a very special Happy New Year to all 33 of you!), you know that roughly three years ago I essentially walked away from more than a decade in clinical medicine to reclaim control over my life and happiness as a consultant.  It’s been a wonderful and powerful growth experience, and a great exercise in trimming the b.s. out of my life.

So I was understandably surprised at myself when I decided last year to get back into clinical practice.  (For the gory details, feel free to visit my post “Dipping a Toe Back in the Pool“).  I’ve now been back in academic clinical medicine for roughly 3 months, and a few of you have asked me for an update on how things have been going.  So here it is:

Keeping in mind that I am still in my honeymoon phase and I have yet to experience all of the crazy politics and administrative pressure of being back in clinical practice……I am over the moon, deliriously, spectacularly happy.

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I don’t think this is an accident.  I think this is an amazing combination of right people, place, and time.  Specifically speaking:

1. My chairman is a god.  Ok, well that’s exaggerating.  Mostly he’s a simply fabulous guy who has managed to become a very skilled administrator while maintaining his coolness as a human being.  He hired me for a very specific role, and since my arrival has not for one minute started piling on “other duties as assigned”.  In fact, there is no such clause in my contract (this being my second time around at this particular rodeo).  In fact, the person who is putting the most pressure on me to be productive is me.  As far as he’s concerned, my first year of salary was a line item in his budget, and he is constantly reminding me not to put too much pressure on myself in my “ramp-up” period.  He also tends to hire lovely, energetic, passionate physicians, so I am surrounded by a department full of (mostly) amazing and happy colleagues.  Yes, I think he is part alien.  He also had a charming accent and likes to put “eh?” on the ends of his sentences, even when they aren’t questions.  Lovely.

2. I am protected from the aspects of clinical medicine I found most damaging in my previous existence.  Really this boils down to three things.  First, I don’t take any overnight call.  NONE whatsoever.  Some docs don’t really mind overnight call.  For me, it made me beyond miserable.  To be fair, my last incarnation of overnight call was in the most dysfunctional model you could ever imagine: in an outpatient practice that received 35,000 patient visits a year, we had NO nurse triage to screen overnight calls.  ANY parent https://www.neon-das.com/cgi-local/store/commerce.cgi?product=EFOthat called into the clinic was routed directly to the on-call physician.  Which meant we were answering parents calling us at 2 in the morning to let us know that their child has had a mild cough for the PAST THREE WEEKS and what should they do about it right that instant?  My favorite was a parent who called me at 4 am to tell me they had run out of baby formula.  Clearly, I went to medical school so I could direct people to look up their local all-night drugstore.

Second, since I don’t have any call, I HAVE NO PAGER.  For those of you who have never carried a pager so long it has actually melded with the flesh near your right hip, you won’t totally get how important this is.  I nearly broke out into a little dance in my chairman’s office my first day at work when he looked at me in his thoughtful way and said, “No, I don’t think you need a pager….not at all, eh?”  My colleagues and my administrative staff all know how to get hold of me through email or my cell if it’s urgent (which it rarely is).  Getting rid of that piercing electronic tumor at my waist has been a very liberating experience.

Third, I have SUPPORT.  A LOT of it.  I have an administrative assistant who handles all the scheduling and paperwork nightmare that I used to have to do for myself.  I have a coordinator who schedules all my patients, takes care of all the insurance approval, and vets me through the right offices for any need I have.  I have a dedicated nurse in clinic who knows exactly how I like to see patients.  And most importantly, all of them are HAPPY to do their jobs.  It’s a miracle.

3. I am part time.  I cannot stress enough how this has been the cornerstone of my happy return to clinical care.  I spent the last three years developing a thriving and satisfying consulting practice, and there was no way I was going to walk away from that.  I’ve started back clinically working one day a week.  Realistically, I work a little more than that in that sometimes I have to take care of some occasional communication or patient followup a different day of the week.  Which, when you love your job, is not a resentful situation at all – it’s part of building a practice.  But it allows me to grow at a unhurried pace and not have any anxiety about justifying my salary.  Plus we have already planned for adding in a second day if (when?) my practice gets too big for one day a week.  Mostly though, being part time protects me from the institutional and administrative politics that I found so damaging in the past.  Working once a week, there is no expectation that I will sit on multiple committees, attend numerous staff meetings, or get sucked into university service I have no interest in doing.  The things I get involved in I do by choice, and make sure they are projects I want to be part of.

4. I am valued.  In this disposable day and age, it is simply miraculous to work in a place where you get to provide a unique service that no one else does, and people actually tell you how grateful they are that you are there.  The fact that I view this as miraculous is sad, but it’s just a fact.

I know how fortunate I am to wake up pretty much every day of my work week now and look forward to what the day has in store for me.  I also know it’s not luck – a lot of work went into making this happen, and still does.

In the spirit of moving forward in a new year, I’m including a link to Kathy Caprino’s most recent article, “The 8 Most Damaging Excuses People Make for Their Unhappiness.”  I have always found her insights to be spot-on when it comes to getting unstuck and allowing yourself the opportunity to have a happy and healthy career.

As always, thanks for reading.

~lumi

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Guilt is Not a Career Platform

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Recently, I read a very interesting Forbes.com post by Kathy Caprino, entitled “Why You Remain Stuck in a Career You Hate.” In it, she gives eight outstanding reasons why those of us who are unhappy in our careers remain paralyzed and unable to move. The first reason on her list (“You Don’t Know Yourself”) resonated strongly with me. It took me eleven years in primary care medicine to come to the conclusion that I just don’t like being a primary care doctor. It’s not a good fit for my personality or how I tend to function in a work role. I’m much happier in a “specialist” model – where I can take more time and function in a niche rather than trying to cover a broad range of things in a very limited period of time.

This is just a simple fact I had to learn about myself. It’s not a judgment about the importance of primary care versus other specialities. On the contrary, I have enormous respect for my colleagues who are primary care providers and do it well. I think they have one of the most challenging jobs on the planet.  I just needed to do enough introspective searching to finally admit to myself that I wasn’t in the right field.

But why did it take me such a long time? The immediate obvious answer is that for those of us who spend the better part of our lifetime training for a specific career, it’s a hard pill to swallow to admit that maybe that career isn’t exactly the best one for you. Especially if you are one of those types who was born knowing you wanted to become a doctor/lawyer/etc. But, as I’ve alluded to in some of my other blog posts, I’ve never been one of those people. I’ve also never really viewed being a physician as a critical part of my identity. I am a person first, who practices medicine second. I know that is not the case for everyone, and that’s the point. We are all different.

In really taking some time to figure out what makes me “tick” as a career person, I came to realize something very important in the months leading up to my eventual resignation from clinical medicine. It turns out that I am one of those self-masochists who loves to turn a career’s worth of guilt inward. I was the stereotypical worrier, wondering what would happen to my patients. If I left, who would take care of them the way I did? How would they get what they needed from someone who didn’t know them like I did?” Looking back, these “guilt scripts” held me hostage for years before I finally took a good hard look at what was preventing me from being happy in my work.

It was actually the fiancé of a friend of mine who inadvertently helped me break through the last of my career shackles. My friend was a nurse practitioner in the clinic I worked in, and the two of us developed a friendship borne out of commiseration. We would often get dinner or hit the local bar after clinic was over and just wallow in the injustices of our work environment. We even had our own little book club so we could have some kind of pretense for getting together. We’d talk about the book for about three minutes, and then the conversation would immediately devolve into a first-class bitch session.

One day her fiancé happened to join us for dinner. He listened to us talk about how trapped we were working for an institution that refused to listen to its employees, and imposed all sorts of inappropriate constraints on us. We bemoaned how powerless we were to make change, despite the fact that we were two of the most outspoken faculty in the clinic. We complained about the unbelievable inefficiency and suboptimal level of care in our clinic due to administrative decisions that clinically left our hands tied.

After this went on for about half an hour, he looked at both of us and then asked quite frankly, “So why do you continue to work there?”

My friend and I of course had all sorts of excuses. Our patients needed us. No one else knew the issues our patients faced as well as we did. As I listened to myself spouting off 101 reasons why I couldn’t leave, I realized I had enough career guilt on board to fuel a Catholic mass for three weeks.

His question stuck with me though. He had planted a seed, and over the next several months it germinated into a big, blooming flower. Eventually I had to admit to myself that my patients somehow had found medical care before they met me, and they would after I left . Would it be the same medical care that I provided them? No. Would they get worse care after I left? Possibly. Or maybe someone would come along and do a better job than I had. Regardless, they would not be left lying in a ditch somewhere. Sure, they would miss me. I have several families that I still keep in touch with by email after having left clinical practice, and they do miss me. But they also are very pleased to hear that I am happy and thriving in my new work.

With due deference to Kathy Caprino, I respectfully submit Reason #9 for her consideration: Guilt Is Not A Career Platform. Certainly not for a fulfilling career anyway.

~lumi

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